RISING WATERS: Cities & Places at Risk

Water beading on a spiderweb. Courtesy Daniel Ochoa de Olza. Our thanks to AP. All rights reserved.

Water beading on a spiderweb. Courtesy Daniel Ochoa de Olza. Our thanks to AP. All rights reserved.

A sampler of interactives, detailed graphics, photo stories and opinion pieces demonstrate and predict how rising waters – sea level rise, urban deltas, flooding and other factors – are a worldwide concern that results in loss of land, life and livelihood.

 Top US cities at risk: At least 20 major US coastal cities with populations of 400,000 or more are at risk from rising waters that, within the next 100 years, that will submerge significant waterfront areas, according to the study’s authors, who looked at 180 coastal cities. Slide show

 New Yorkers below sea level:  Just a year ago! 

 Disappearing coastal lands: This rich interactive from National Public Radio (go to continents)  offers predictions of how sea level rise from the melting of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets would affect cities and urban centers in Europe, Asia, Africa, and the US Gulf coast in the next 100 to 1000 years (NPR 2009- click to go to continents)

 Sinking of a sovereign nation: An op-ed by Marcus Steven, president of Nauru – a sovereign island nation that is a member of the Pacific Small Island Developing States – raises a clarion call about how his country and others (Tuvalu, Kiribati, Solomon Islands, Marshall Islands, and Papua New Guinea) may vanish within two generations. l

 What is a deterritorialized state? Law professor Rosemary Rayfuse (Australia/Sweden) considers “life after land,” the legal status and future of island nations such as the Maldives that will be literally underwater someday.